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40% of the electricity in the developed world is used in buildings. At home, you’re in control of that. It’s a prime opportunity to save energy – and reap the benefits.

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Whether you’re a student, teacher, parent or administrator, you can reduce the energy your school uses. The energy habits you help build there will carry over to the rest of people’s lives.

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You can make a big impact on the energy use in your office, and build teamwork by having others join your efforts. Your company will value the leadership and results.

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Cities spend up to 20% of their electricity just to pump, purify and recycle their water. That means wasting water is pouring energy down the drain. Here’s a great place to start saving.

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Energy does work for you. When you do the work yourself – like walking instead of driving – you trade energy for exercise. It turns out that saving energy is usually good for your health.

Our modern food system is completely dependent on energy. Buying and preparing food that saves energy is usually also cheaper and much healthier. Check it out.

A third of global energy — nearly all of it oil — goes into moving ourselves and our products. This is a huge opportunity for energy savings.

Everything you buy consumes energy, in sourcing the materials, manufacturing, shipping, retailing and often in use. Smart shopping saves energy – and usually money too.

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Most household appliances are in the kitchen, so this is a great place to reduce energy use and cut expenses.

Reuse Cooking Water

Reuse leftover water from steaming vegetables in soup or other cooking. Don’t pour the vitamins and flavor down the drain.

Report All Leaks

Report broken pipes, open hydrants, errant sprinklers, running toilets or leaky sinks to the superintendent, property owner or a city dispatcher.

Sweep Don’t Spray

Use a broom to clean your driveway or sidewalk instead of hosing it down. The extra exercise is good for you!